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Susan Schwartz

Susan Schwartz

Susan Schwartz

Susan E. Schwartz, PhD, Jungian analyst and clinical psychologist, is a member of the International Association of Analytical Psychology. She has taught in numerous Jungian programs and presented at conferences, workshops and lectures in the USA and many other countries. Susan has articles in several journals and chapters in books on Jungian analytical psychology. Her book published by Routledge in November 2020 is entitled, The Absent Father Effect on Daughters, Father Desire, Father Wounds. Susan’s analytical private practice is in Paradise Valley, Arizona, USA.

Courses and Lecturesby Susan Schwartz

Articlesby Susan Schwartz

Where is the Father’s Gaze to a Daughter

Where is the Father’s Gaze to a Daughter

Fathering reflects a universal symbolic pattern in the individual and collective, conscious and unconscious. We come into this world needing a father, his recognition and to be lovingly seen by him. We innately require a nurturing and caring father figure while his lack of presence affects a daughter’s mind, body and soul.

Stand Alone

Father Images that Live Inside Us

A woman dreamt she was to take care of her father. The meaning of this dream depends on the dreamer and can mean many things about the relationship with her father. Why is she to take care of him? What is the dreamer’s desire, and what are the implied wounds? Jung said, “The father is decisive in the destiny of the individual .”This quote reminds us of the value of a loving father for a daughter’s growth.

Loneliness and Desire for Belonging

Loneliness and Desire for Belonging

Longing is a strong, persistent desire for something seeming unattainable or distant. It is related to hunger, yearning for family, partner, group, or self. Psychologically, longing relates to a primal human desire, the need and impetus to overcome the ego alienated from the unconscious, to feel inclusion, not exclusion, acceptance, not rejection, and love, not hate.

Culture and Belonging

Culture and Belonging

Our existence is fundamentally interpersonal. Human beings are not isolated, free-floating objects, but subjects existing in perpetual, multiple, shifting relationships. Life is defined by these myriad interactions – by the push and pull of inter-subjectivity as well as the overt and covert social contracts. Through them we realize our incompleteness and vulnerability.